Personal Finance Tips – How to Legally Never Pay Back 70% of Your Unsecured Debt

To be in loan trouble can be a big cause for anxiety. Your health could deteriorate and in a matter of time you could find yourself snapping at anyone who tries to make simple conversation with you. All his could happen out of sheer frustration in being over your head in debt.

The problem however could be solved easily. In fact it is easier than you think. It is natural to feel the walls are closing in when you are in debt but with if you had been given proper personal finance tips you would have found yourself almost debt-free.

The good news is provided you owe in excess of $10,000 to say a credit card company; you have the option of having to never pay back 70 percent of your unsecured debt.

A good example

In fact a credit card company would be a good example as they do not require collateral when they hand you over that coveted piece of plastic which can go on to make your life miserable. Although personal finance tips can prove to be beneficial, the thing to be remembered is that they are best taken if you happen to have pots of money.

Most credit card companies have made $10,000 the benchmark from which they would be willing to negotiate down interest rates. It is not exactly a hard and fast rule but the figure is generally followed by most card companies. It may sound strange, but the higher the amount you owe, the more willing they would be to bring down your interest rate to a less obscene level.

This is because with the recession, they cannot afford to lose even a cent from their customers so they are more than happy to retrieve anything they can. In fact, they would be quite happy to get back the principal but perhaps for the sake of it, they also insist on some interest as well.

The credit card companies have themselves to blame. They should have realized their abnormally high interest rates would mean many people would default on repayments. With the economy being what it is, the number of defaulters has turned into millions and that adds up to a considerable amount of money. Undoubtedly, this has a serious effect on the company bottom line.

It is doubtful even personal finance tips could have warned you of what lay ahead. Not even the best analysts could really predict this recession for sure.

Personal Finance Tip – Pay Cash For All Non-Investment Expenditures

Most personal finance gurus continually stress the importance of budgeting for monitoring and modifying poor spending habits. However, I have noticed that most people who attempt to implement a family budget eventually give up on the activity, mainly because it takes the fun out of spending money. You know what, I agree! An impulse purchase here and there feels good! And as it turns out, an impulse purchase made on occasion won’t necessarily create a big problem for most us. The problems arise when we decide to make them on credit. Here’s an excellent personal finance tip for all you budget-haters out there – pay cash for all non-investment expenditures and eliminate your need to budget.

What is a Non-Investment Expenditure Anyway?

First off, let’s define investment expenditure. By my own definition, an investment expenditure is a transaction that involves the purchase of an asset that appreciates in value. On the flip side, a non-investment expenditure represents all other transactions. One quick check you can make before whipping out your credit card to buy something is to ask yourself, “Is there a high likelihood that I will be able to sell this item in the future for more than I am paying now?” If the answer is “no,” pay cash. If you don’t have the money, you can’t make the purchase. It’s that simple.

Examples of Non-Investment Expenditures

Unfortunately, the vast majority of our everyday spending is classified as non-investment expenditures. Groceries, fuel for the vehicles, dining out, your cell phone bill, a new pair of designer jeans – these are all non-investment expenditures. Some of these items may be extremely important, even life sustaining. But purchasing on credit, even for life sustaining expenditures, encourages excess. Let’s take food, for instance. To purchase enough food for the family to survive really does not cost much money. What costs us a pile of money are the rib-eye steaks, junk food, alcoholic beverages, and sodas we routinely buy. Moreover, these foods are bad for our health! Grocery shopping with cash forces us to reconsider the food choices we make, in terms of both health and money. And that’s a good thing.

What Else is There?

You may be asking yourself, “Would any of my spending be classified as investment expenditures?” For me, two things come to mind – your home and your education. A home is rather obvious because, over time, houses have always increased in value. A college education would also be considered an investment because it provides one the opportunity to earn more money than he would otherwise make. Because these two items are considered investments, taking out a loan to pay for them can be justified. In addition, home mortgages and college loans offer some of the lowest interest rates of any form of credit, making them even more attractive expenditures.

One Caveat to Consider

Although following the above advice can eliminate the need for a budget, one other choice must be made to assure financial success in the future. An automatic investment plan must be initiated to make certain your investment accounts are funded before all the money is spent. If you work for a company that offers a 401k plan, this is done automatically. If you have outside accounts, you will have to notify the firm to initiate automatic transfers from your checking account. With most firms, you can set up the automatic transfers yourself from your online account interface.

Summary

Although a budget is a fantastic tool for monitoring and modifying our spending habits, the cold hard truth is that many of us will never stick to one. Should these folks be doomed to financial hell for the rest of their lives for this so-called lack of discipline? Of course, not! Just follow our simple personal finance tip to pay cash for all non-investment expenditures and you, too, will reach financial success in the future.

Three Essential Personal Finance Tips

Personal finance is extremely important in today’s society. Whether you are looking to purchase a new home, pay for college or take a trip of a lifetime, personal finance can help you achieve these goals. While there are many ways to benefit from good money management, here are three essential personal finance tips that can truly help you achieve your goals.

Save and Invest

It is absolutely essential that you save as much money as possible and then invest it so that it can work hard for you. Saving money is vital to having a nest egg in the future for the purchases you desire. Saving requires a plan and usually lots of time. One of things that you should do once you receive your paycheck is to pay yourself first. Take a set amount of your pay check and put it away. Once you have money saved, the next step is to invest it and make it work hard for you. Over the years, you can earn hundreds of thousands of dollars off of just $30K to 50K in savings using the power of compound interest. There is no magic involved. In order to create a nest egg in 10, 20 or 30 years save money and invest it.

Create a Budget

Creating a budget is essential for anyone that has an income and expenses. Many of us are usually carefree and do not keep a record of all our purchases, however if we knew just how much we spent each year on junk or impulse purchases we would be aghast. Creating a budget is a great way to understand what we spend our income on, reduce spending on non essential items and discipline ourselves to save and invest our money for the long term. Creating a budget is extremely simple and requires only a few hours of time each month. A simple budget can literally save you thousands of dollars a year and give you true piece of mind.

Use Credit Wisely

Credit cards can be extremely convenient, but many times they are equally destructive. A credit card is not a license to spend; it is in effect a loan. Understanding how credit works and how to use it responsibly can make your life much easier. Credit cards can be a great option in certain situations, however using them properly is essential to proper money management.